Stephen Daldry Wins 2020 Tony Award for Direction of THE INHERITANCE

Tony Awards

Stephen Daldry has won Best Direction of a Play at the 74th Annual Tony Awards for his direction of The Inheritance | Photo: Theo Wargo

By
Nathan Pugh
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September 26, 2021 8:16 PM
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Stephen Daldry has won Best Direction of a Play at the 74th Annual Tony Awards for his direction of The Inheritance. This is Daldry’s third Tony Award nomination and win. He previously won the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Play in 1994 for his direction of An Inspector Calls, and the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical in 2009 for his direction of Billy Elliot the Musical

Daldry won the award over Best Direction of a Play nominees David Cromer (The Sound Inside), Kenny Leon (A Soldier’s Play), Jamie Lloyd (Betrayal), and Robert O’Hara (Slave Play). 

Daldry was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2004. He has won three Olivier Awards, for his direction of An Inspector Calls (1993), Machinal (1994), and The Inheritance (2019). Daldry has been nominated for both the Academy Award for Best Director and the BAFTA Award for Best Director three times, for his direction of Billy Elliot (2000), The Hours (2002), and The Reader (2008). He has also directed the feature films Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (2011), Trash (2014), and the television film Together (2021).

From 2016 through 2020, Daldry served as a producer and director for the television series The Crown. For his role as Executive Producer he won the 2017 Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series — Drama, and also won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series in 2018 for his direction of The Crown episode Paterfamilias.


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Nathan Pugh

Nathan Pugh is a writer, culture critic, and essayist based in the Washington, D.C. area. Nathan graduated from Wesleyan University with a BA in Theater and English (concentration in race/ethnicity), where he also served as the Co-Editor-in-Chief of The Wesleyan Argus. Pugh’s work strives to explore how intersectional identities are staged, with his current long-form writing focusing on Black gay playwrights from Virginia.